Inception

2

Comments

  • edited July 2010
    Guys, shouldn't the last shot be meaningless, as Saito touched Cobb's totem (harharhar) while in limbo? Or is that just another guideline?
    Post edited by JukeBoxJosh on
  • Oh wow that is cool.
  • I dunno. Both of them sorta sound like
    image
    if you slow them down enough.
  • It's a paradox.
  • It's a paradox.
    image
  • It's a paradox.
    You rang?
  • i need to re-watch it but this was my initial interpretation: memento.
  • At the end, whether or not the spinning totem fell over wasn't the point - the point was that Cobb didn't care.
  • edited July 2010
    It's a paradox.
    You rang?
    Pairofdachs?
    image
    Post edited by GreatTeacherMacRoss on


  • Maybe I should watch Paprika since I never have, and it's been on my shelf for a while now. >.>
  • Maybe I should watch Paprika since I never have, and it's been on my shelf for a while now. >.>
    You should. Nolan said it was one of the influences for Inception.
  • So everyone feels a bit dumber after seeing that.
  • So everyone feels a bit dumber after seeing that.
    Indeed, however it was still nice to watch.

    I also want to point out, I really enjoyed Joseph Gordon-Levitt in this movie. I remember watching him in 3rd Rock From the Sun and 10 Things I Hate About You, and always though of him as the scrawny good guy. There were a few scenes in Inception where I would look at him and think that he looks like Heath Ledger and swoon for a bit. I think it's mostly just the jaw line and mouth that reminds me of him.

    I should go watch 500 Days of Summer now.

    I also showed that pic to a friend and he responded, "Well aren't we all dumbasses?"
  • Why..... why did I not think of that.
  • Why..... why did I not think of that.
    I know. I usually think of all these things.
  • Why..... why did I not think of that.
    I know. I usually think of all these things.
    Great movies do this to you. Skilled directors/writers are able to suspect your reality/reasoning and are able to immerse you in a world so convincing that you have to take the time to reflect on the situation for you to discover the "easy way out".
  • Great movies do this to you. Skilled directors/writers are able to suspect your reality/reasoning and are able to immerse you in a world so convincing that you have to take the time to reflect on the situation for you to discover the "easy way out".
    Even greater writers make it so there is no easy way out to discover.
  • Ok, here's my bs attempt to justify it. He's a fugitive from the law in the US and is subject to extradition. The US know that his children are in the US, if his kids leave to go overseas then the French police will be looking for him at the grandfathers.

    ....

    Yeah, that's a stretch.
  • Great movies do this to you. Skilled directors/writers are able to suspect your reality/reasoning and are able to immerse you in a world so convincing that you have to take the time to reflect on the situation for you to discover the "easy way out".
    Even greater writers make it so there is no easy way out to discover.
    I agree that the greatest writers craft a perfect tale. Inception is a goodexample of what Andrew is saying, though. The #1 reason I didn't consider that plot hole was because I was just enjoying the movie too damn much. If the story didn't have my by the balls, I'd be slightly bored in the theater, and my mind would be racing away poking holes in the film.
  • edited August 2010
    I agree that the greatest writers craft a perfect tale. Inception is a goodexample of what Andrew is saying, though. The #1 reason I didn't consider that plot hole was because I was just enjoying the movie too damn much. If the story didn't have my by the balls, I'd be slightly bored in the theater, and my mind would be racing away poking holes in the film.
    Reminds me of my mom. Any movie she watches, even if she's really engrossed, she keeps asking questions and trying to poke holes, even when there are none to poke. The worst is if its one of those movies that leaves things intentionally unexplained only to explain them later. She won't shut up until that explanation appears. Just hope that she accepts the explanation, or it will get even worse.
    Post edited by Apreche on
  • Great movies do this to you. Skilled directors/writers are able to suspect your reality/reasoning and are able to immerse you in a world so convincing that you have to take the time to reflect on the situation for you to discover the "easy way out".
    It's known as a fridge moment.
  • I agree that the greatest writers craft a perfect tale. Inception is a goodexample of what Andrew is saying, though. The #1 reason I didn't consider that plot hole was because I was just enjoying the movie too damn much. If the story didn't have my by the balls, I'd be slightly bored in the theater, and my mind would be racing away poking holes in the film.
    Reminds me of my mom. Any movie she watches, even if she's really engrossed, she keeps asking questions and trying to poke holes, even when there are none to poke. The worst is if its one of those movies that leaves things intentionally unexplained only to explain them later. She won't shut up until that explanation appears. Just hope that she accepts the explanation, or it will get even worse.
    Oh that is incredibly annoying. I have the common courtesty to keep it as internal thought. My list of acceptable reasons to speak in a theater begins with injury requiring hospital admission (a friend of mine had her appendix burst during Two Towers).
  • Oh that is incredibly annoying. I have the common courtesty to keep it as internal thought. My list of acceptable reasons to speak in a theater begins with injury requiring hospital admission (a friend of mine had her appendix burst during Two Towers).
    Thankfully she won't do it in a theater. Maybe she'll whisper in your ear if you're next to her, and she can't help it. But if you're at home on the couch in front of the TV, watch out!
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